Fancy a chance to catch BOOM?

We are giv­ing away 5 pairs of tick­ets to our read­ers to catch BOOM on its open­ing night on 29th June. All you have to do is to answer a ques­tion at that end of this post.

BOOM is Sight Lines Production’s sopho­more pro­duc­tion and it was con­cep­tu­al­ized amidst the back­drop of 2008’s En-bloc fever. This June’s stag­ing fea­tures a revamped and time­ly sto­ry that cap­tures the uproar sur­round­ing recent pub­lic projects such as the impend­ing demo­li­tion of Rochor Cen­tre, Buk­it Brown Ceme­tery and the KTM Rail­way Corridor.The gleam­ing cor­po­rate tow­ers and mega-express­ways that replace these icons, sig­nal Singapore’s progress to the world – but at what cost?

SHOW SYNOPSIS
On this tiny red dot, where sand is as pre­cious as gold, and both liv­ing and dead jos­tle for space, BOOM tells the sto­ry of a stub­born old woman and her prop­er­ty agent son, who are strug­gling over the en bloc sale of their home. Their des­tinies become linked with that of Jere­mi­ah, an ide­al­is­tic civ­il ser­vant, who is fac­ing the great­est chal­lenge of his career– per­suad­ing a reluc­tant corpse to relo­cate.

Wel­come to the sur­re­al world of BOOM, where the dead aren’t allowed to rest in peace and heav­en is a lux­u­ry sky vil­la with A1 design­er decor. The line between liv­ing and dead, between fan­ta­sy and real­i­ty, is con­stant­ly blurred in this com­ic yet poignant tale about en blocs and exhuma­tions.

For more infor­ma­tion, please check out BOOM here.

Now to win those tick­ets, sim­ply answer the ques­tion below via the mes­sage box at the bot­tom of this page. We will choose the best 5 entries and clos­ing date of this con­test ends on 26th June, Tues­day. So hur­ry and have a go at it!

QUESTION: What is the cost for urban­iza­tion?


View in HD [here].


14 Comments

  • Guan Liang

    June 19, 2012

    … the ran­som of steel and glass which we can nev­er pay in full; we extort from our chil­dren instead laugh­ter and open spaces to pay for our mis­giv­ings.

    Reply
  • Cassandra Chan

    June 20, 2012

    Urban­iza­tion is a process between leg­is­la­tors and cit­i­zens that results in dia­logue, evokes emo­tions;
    Where some­times places get reju­ve­nat­ed, oth­er times lost.

    But most of all it helps every­one redis­cov­er the for­got­ten.

    It only becomes a heavy price to pay when the day comes and no one both­ers to fight for these places to be remem­bered in some form or anoth­er. That’s when we real­ly lose a part of our his­to­ry and our soul.

    Reply
  • Yinxiu

    June 21, 2012

    The cost of urban­iza­tion is the loss of his­to­ry and her­itage, and in some cas­es, the loss of cul­ture as well. In urban­iz­ing, the old has to be dis­placed and excret­ed to be replaced with the new. His­to­ry is lost when sig­nif­i­cant land­marks give way to spank­ing new shop­ping malls that hold no mean­ing to the peo­ple. Her­itage is for­got­ten when the old­er folks do not have the struc­tures to help them tell their sto­ry to the young ones. How­ev­er, it is not just the infra­struc­ture that is lost. Take for exam­ple the kam­pongs. It is by no doubt that liv­ing con­di­tions have improved by leaps and bounds with the replace­ment of the HDB flats. How­ev­er, togeth­er with the kam­pong hous­ing, the cul­ture of the kam­pong spir­it is mis­placed along the way too. Neigh­bours do not seem to know one anoth­er. Every­one minds their own busi­ness. We are no longer as friend­ly and help­ful as the kam­pong dwellers used to be. This in itself is a great loss, and we can only hope to find and rebuild that won­der­ful kam­pong spir­it again in our con­crete jun­gle.

    Reply
  • Michael

    June 23, 2012

    In the rush to urbanise we lose all sight of how we come into being.

    Reply
  • Naomia Maharani

    June 23, 2012

    More of stress, hec­tic life, mon­ey mind­ed greedy peo­ple & loss of iden­ti­ty.

    Reply
  • Ng Chow Yong

    June 24, 2012

    Here’s an ode to our his­to­ry — the cost for urban­iza­tion:

    His­to­ry reminds us of our past,
    Our past that stands the test of time.
    Urban­iza­tion forces us to move fast,
    Faster and faster, we nev­er ask why.
    As time goes by in the blink of an eye,
    The times that we lived past us by.
    As urban­iza­tion bids our his­to­ry good­bye,
    Remants of our past dis­ap­pear.
    For­ev­er.
    And ever.

    Reply
  • James Teo

    June 24, 2012

    Many times the cost of urban­iza­tion is the loss of her­itage where sites of cul­tur­al, his­tor­i­cal, and archae­o­log­i­cal sig­nif­i­cance are often under threat to make way for new­er and taller build­ings

    Reply
  • Joeanne Shim

    June 24, 2012

    Too rapid the urban­iza­tion will lead to many social prob­lems such as lack of prop­er hous­ing, traf­fic con­ges­tion, high crime rates etc

    Reply
  • Kao Rong Sheng

    June 24, 2012

    As the indus­tries of the world are grow­ing fast, urban­i­sa­tion is pro­ceed­ing so rapid­ly that it is gen­er­at­ing large­ly unpre­dict­ed prob­lems one hun­dred years ago. Although, of course, there can be some ben­e­fits like more employ­ment and eco­nom­ic ben­e­fits, there are also bad effects like pol­lut­ing our envi­ron­ments as lots of fac­to­ries are built on the new areas fol­low­ing the urban­i­sa­tion.

    Dur­ing the process of clear­ing out nat­ur­al habi­tats as the first phase of the urban­i­sa­tion, destroy­ing an ecosys­tem exist­ing on those areas is inevitable. Though gov­ern­ments are occa­sion­al­ly keep them in its orig­i­nal con­di­tion for the image of the town when the habi­tats are small in size, nor­mal­ly, most of the liv­ing crea­tures in the areas are get­ting extinct­ed. Nev­er­the­less, this tragedy is hap­pen­ing even now for people’s well-being itself.

    While the coun­try is becom­ing wealthy eco­nom­i­cal­ly, it is also becom­ing poor envi­ron­men­tal­ly as a result of the exploit­ing. Tox­ic gas­es and severe­ly pol­lut­ed water from the fac­to­ry will bring air, water pol­lu­tion, which will even­tu­al­ly lead to the low qual­i­ty of life.

    Even though there was pos­i­tive effects such as the increase of employ­ment, urban­i­sa­tion brought seri­ous harm­ful effects on our envi­ron­ment. It seemed like we are improv­ing our qual­i­ty of life at the cost of destruc­tion of ecosys­tem, was actu­al­ly set­ting back in a long term. It is advis­able for the nations to care more about the envi­ron­ment and to be crit­ic on government’s absurd deci­sion.

    Reply
  • Teo Kai Lynn

    June 24, 2012

    The cost of urban­iza­tion is caus­ing old her­itage sites, which defines us and tells the sto­ry of our coun­try to make way to high rise build­ings, which is a pity real­ly. The next gen­er­a­tion can only vis­it them on pho­tographs in future.

    Reply
  • Nurdianah

    June 25, 2012

    Loss of unique­ness and a sense of iden­ti­ty; instead of stand­ing out, we’re just anoth­er dupli­cate with­out a soul amidst the mass­es.

    Reply
  • alina

    June 25, 2012

    Main cost would be it makes every­thing run on tur­bo speed. Prob­lems that has nev­er occurred in a ruru­al area inten­si­fies expo­nen­tial­ly. More and more peo­ple start to gath­er in a small space, every­one rush­ing around to get mul­ti­ple things done simul­ta­ne­ous­ly and pres­sure seeps from one stressed out per­son try­ing to mul­ti-task all the way to thou­sands of cars honk­ing along the high­way.
    As every­one is on their quest for suc­cess, anx­i­ety and stress cloud a person’s per­cep­tion on a care­free lifestyle.

    Reply
  • Bhavna Naresh

    June 25, 2012

    We sim­ply for­get who we are.

    Reply
  • Dallas Goh

    June 25, 2012

    I feel that urban­iza­tion cost us our tra­di­tions and our her­itage. It’s sad to see impor­tant land­marks in Sin­ga­pore slow­ly dis­s­a­pear­ing from the map, and even if they ren­o­vate the place, it does not reflect the past and it’s mear­ly just anoth­er new place in town.

    Reply

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